This unit is ongoing, and will take the duration of the course to complete.  The final Demo Reel unit is due on the last day of class in June 2018.
 
Important advice!
 
Screencast, take screenshots, take action photos and capture video of your work throughout the year.  This footage will be key when presented your work in a demo reel.  Try manipulating the time-rate of your footage.  It is not always about your final projects, it is about what YOU did in the project and how your creative process.
 
 
 
Take a look at what Pixar recommends!
 
For first-timers putting together a reel, here are some helpful guidelines from one of Pixar’s former
interns, who joined our ranks as an employee. This information is primarily geared towards our
Technical Direction and Animation positions. For people interested in Editorial, we understand your reels  will be longer in length and music/sound will play an important part in demonstrating your editorial ability.
 
1) An application that requires a demo reel submission has 5 parts:
        a)  Cover letter
        b)  Resume
        c)  Demo reel
        d)  Demo reel breakdown
        e)  Online application (the application contains the Reel Submission Agreement)
 
The cover letter can (and should) be brief. The resume should tell us where you’ve worked, what you
did when you worked, what kind of coursework you’ve had, and what tools, languages, and systems you  can use. The demo reel breakdown is really essential (see #7 below). Don’t force us to look at a website—when we’re looking at reels, we’re all greased and ready to go with reels, not websites.
(We will look at websites if we’re hiring you as a web designer.)
 
2) Your reel should be no more than 4 minutes.
Just like a resume is no more than 2 pages unless you’ve been CEO or a senator. If you have a
lot of great material, do a 4-minute version, and then refer to longer pieces on a DVD afterwards
if you get that far into the process. “For the entire short see the additional
materials section…blah blah blah yakity shmakity.”
 
Don’t do a “collage” of your work, with interleaved random clips from all your different work.
No, no, no. We won’t be able to figure out what’s going on. DO give each piece the time it deserves,
no more nor less, and just show it once. Keep it simple.
 
3) Don’t show unapproved work.
Don’t show work from other studios if it has not been approved or we will not look at the demo reel.
 
4) Nobody cares about music/soundtrack.
We turn off the sound. But sometimes we listen to it and get really annoyed if we don’t like your taste in music. Keep it basic or leave it off.
 
5) Put your best work first.
Lead Technical Directors often have 10 to 20 reels to go through. They might watch the first minute, see if anything  intrigues them. If so, they’ll watch the other 2 minutes. If not, they move on. Show your best, most impressive work first—presumably the work you are specifically applying for. Make it clear on your demo reel, cover letter, and resume what type of position you’re applying for. Don’t try to change your demo reel because our website says we only need, say, lighting TDs now, either. Say what you’re good at and make your reel demonstrate that.
 
6) Demo Reel Breakdown (DRB).
We want to know what you did on this reel. Here’s a shot of a Luxo lamp jumping over a ball.
Did you model the lamp? Do the animation? Shade it? Light it? Render it? Write the story? Executive-produce it?
The DRB should tell us what we’re looking at, what YOU did on it, and what tools you used.
“Sleeping ball: (June 2003) Group project; I shaded the plastic sphere in Slim/Renderman” is a good entry.  “Group project; project used Maya, Slim, Renderman, and Perl” is less useful.
Put this on the frame before the sequence and again in the DRB we can refer to. We often fall behind
in reading your DRB; help us keep track of what you’re showing. If you have two dozen entries, number the DRB and put numbers on the reel, too—we may not know the difference between your “Sleeping ball”  animation and the opus you call “Lazy Sphere.”
 
7) Include a title card at the beginning and end with your name, address, phone, and email.
Including the position you’re looking for is not a bad idea, either. The opening one doesn’t need to go on  too long, but the end one should last for a while. Don’t make people desperately pause to get your email address.
 
8) Show work that proves that you know what you did.
If you’ve done a sequence, show it at several stages of production. If you’ve done shading, show the basic colour pass, the procedural shading, the painting, and a lit version. If you wrote clever software, include real work that was done with the software and include on the title card something like, “Implemented simulation of Segway dynamics” in addition to everything else you did. Don’t show screenshots of people using the  software or screen grabs of C++ code.
 
9) Take the time to polish.
It seems silly, but people get in such a rush to get the reel out the door, they lose sight of the big picture.  THIS IS HOW YOU WILL GET A JOB. And since it’s a job in a visual industry—it should LOOK really, really good.  Don’t use clashing colours. Make sure your shaders are anti-aliased. Make sure your lights aren’t blown out too bright.  Make it clear what we’re looking at. Don’t use confusing fonts. Keep it clean and simple!
 
10) Show it to other people.
Have other people critique it. Not necessarily the work on it, but the way you’re presenting your work.
(Though getting critiques of the work on it is a great idea, too.) If a bunch of people are working on their  reels at the same time, have a Reel Showing one night.
 
11) If you really don’t have stuff to put on a reel, don’t send one.
Well-presented still images can be as effective as moving pictures.  Make sure you apply online, understand the submission process as defined in the job description, understand the submission guidelines, and upload any necessary files if applicable.
 
 
 
– Research Pixar’s advice on Demo Reels
– Research demo reels of artist similar to you
– Create Demo Reel Portfolio Project
– Create DemoReel video
– Describe your Process
 
 
 
Part 1 – Portfolio & Behance Set-up:
Students are to create a Behance Demo Reel Project.  Complete the following requirements:  
 
Behance Unit Demo Reel Project:
Cover:
-Reflect theme of Course
-Art Cover image 404 X 316
-Text “Demo Reel”
 
Settings:
Creative Fields:
-Apply 3 project theme-related  “Creative Fields”
 
Tags:
– 15 theme generated tags (use key concepts)
 
Project Description:
– “This is my Sisler IDM & Digital Voices demo reel.”
 
Extra Information:
-Brand: Digital Voices and SislerIDM
-Agency: Winnipeg School Division
-School: Sisler High School
 
Credits:
-Add the cast and crew with roles.  No one should be listed
 
Tools Used:
-Identify all tools used in this unit:  Adobe Flash CS6, Adobe Audition CS6, Behance, paper, pencils, light-table
 
Content:
-Embed all Unit components 
-Title each activity
-Use the portfolio Text styles appropriately
 
Part 2 – Research:
Students are to search for post-secondary/industry Demo Reels. Complete the following requirements:  
a)  Embed and source your top 3 demo reels.  Use captions under each demo reel to explain 1-2 elements you like about each demo reel.
b)  Highlight your favourite demo reel.  Use captions under the demo reel to detail why you think this  is the best example of a demo reel.
 
Part 3 – Demo Reel:
Students are to complete the following elements of their academic career at Sisler High School:  
        a)  Cover letter
        b)  Resume
        c)  Demo reel
        d)  Demo reel breakdown
        e)  Online application (the application contains the Reel Submission Agreement)
 
Be sure to apply the recommendations provided by Pixar.
 
Attention!  Please do not insert your personal information, such as: phone number, and/or email address
 
Important advice AGAIN!
 
Screencast, take screenshots, take action photos and capture video of your work throughout the year.  This footage will be key when presented your work in a demo reel.  Try manipulating the time-rate of your footage.  It is not always about your final projects, it is about what YOU did in the project and how your creative process.
 
 
 
– Application of Research – /10 marks
– Demo Reel Portfolio Project –   / 20 marks
– Demo Reel video –   /60 marks
– Describe your Process –   /10 marks